Short Story Review: “The Necromancer’s Apprentice” by Lillian Stewart Carl

2 of 5 stars.

While Victorian era detective stories aren’t rare–think: Sherlock Holmes, much less common are Elizabethan era detective tales. And yet here, the Virgin Queen herself makes a royal appearance.

Early in Elizabeth’s reign while Spain is still employing nefarious machinations to usurp the Protestant throne of England to deliver it back to the Pope, a lord rumored to have affections and possibly even relations with the queen loses his wife to an untimely tumble down a flight of stairs.

To stop the tongues from wagging about his own possible involvement, the lord orders a necromancer to obtain better evidence and insight into the death of his wife, to see if anybody was indeed responsible for the death. Was it murder? Or even shameful suicide?

The tale is rather light on the actual detecting aspect as it’s more of a mage’s tale. The necromancer really just sets about talking to ghosts, not hunting clues.

This tale appears in Weird Detectives: Recent Investigations edited by Paula Guran.

 
 
 
[Check out my other reviews here.]

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One response to “Short Story Review: “The Necromancer’s Apprentice” by Lillian Stewart Carl

  1. Pingback: Anthology Review: Weird Detectives: Recent Investigations edited by Paula Guran | Jaffalogue

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