Review: “Resurrection Points” by Usman T. Malik

3 of 5 stars.

With real-life dystopian societies aplenty, there’s no need to invent one. Set in modern day Pakistan, this tale makes clear the inanity and horror of Muslim-Christian conflict. The supernatural elements tie to the religiously shared accounts of Lazarus.

Daoud shares the supernatural ability of bio-electricity with his doctor father, Baba, who uses his bio-electricity to help heal and control pain as generations of men in the family have done. Daoud learns to control the talent on a corpse which merely twitches and jumps as he charges its neural nodes. However, he notices that the teenaged corpse he and his father, both Muslims, practice on is a Christian that was tortured in multiple ways then drowned in the river. But the dead victim cannot accuse his attacker(s). After the dissection and practice, Baba pays to have the body buried but gets visited by an agent for Sharia law enforcement that decrees that Christians cannot be buried with Muslims.

Later, Daoud goes to visit his friend Sadiq who sends him away in a hurry and sinks a metal box into the dark waters of the river. That night Sadiq’s Christian neighborhood is attacked–50 houses burned, 20 dead, including Sadiq’s father.

Daoud practices further on a dead cat on the road, the cat reanimates and stays reanimated, like a modern day Lazarus . . .

When Daoud walks in on his mother, he spies her hidden picture of the Crucifixion of Christ. Word soon comes that an accident has occurred at Baba’s doctor’s office conveniently after Baba’s marriage certificate comes to light revealing his wife’s maiden name . . .

“Resurrection Points” appears in The Year’s Best Dark Fantasy and Horror: 2015 edited by Paula Guran and published by Prime Books. It first appeared in Strange Horizons, August 04, 2014.
 
 
 
[Check out my other reviews here.]

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One response to “Review: “Resurrection Points” by Usman T. Malik

  1. Pingback: Novella Review: The Pauper Prince and the Eucalyptus Jinn by Usman T. Malik | Jaffalogue

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